Eat Good Food

Vinaigrette Recipe: Classic Dijon Salad Dressing

This classic Dijon vinaigrette is simple and delicious. It is traditionally mixed together in the bottom of a large salad bowl. After it’s made, lettuce and any other ingredients are added to the bowl and gently tossed to completely coat the greens, while leaving any excess dressing at the bottom of the bowl.

Dijon Vinaigrette

Small clove of chopped garlic
Coarse salt
Freshly ground pepper
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
4 tablespoons good olive oil

Salad greens such as endive, bibb, or other leaf lettuces plus fresh tarragon leaves

Wash the greens and dry them well, first in a salad spinner and then by rolling them up in a towel. Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Place a small clove of chopped garlic into a wooden salad bowl, add a pinch of coarse salt and some freshly ground black pepper, and use the back of a wooden salad spoon to mash them into a coarse paste.

Add dijon mustard and red wine vinegar, mix that around a bit, then pour in olive oil and stir together.

Let the vinaigrette sit in the bottom of the bowl until just before serving, then add the salad greens and a few fresh tarragon leaves.

Bring the bowl to the table and toss the salad toward the end of the meal.

Bon appetit!

Eat Good Food

Aperitif Recipe: SHED’s French 25 Twist

The traditional apéritif, also called an apéro for short, is a French ritual. Before eating dinner (and sometimes lunch), the French like to enjoy a low-alcohol apéritif with friends and family – whether it be a cocktail, liqueur, or wine.

A chance to relax and chat before eating a meal, the apéritif is normally served with light snacks such as olives, cheese and crackers, nuts, or crisps and is an opportunity to whet the appetite before the meal.

It’s common to touch glasses and say “Santé!” (good health!) or “Tchin-Tchin!” (cheers!)

The French 25 is a twist on the classic French 75 apéritif. Created by SHED Beverage and Café Manager Patricia Philitsa, this summer cocktail features Meyer lemon juice and lavender. It’s perfect for a French-inspired afternoon on the terrace.

French 25 Aperitif
Serves 2

1 ounce Lillet Blanc
1/2 ounce oz D’Pampe Vermouth Rosé
3/4 ounce fresh Meyer lemon juice (can substitute fresh orange juice)
2 dashes lavender bitters
Sparkling wine
Sprig of lavender

In cocktail shaker, combine Lillet Blanc, D’Pampe Vermouth Rosé, Meyer lemon juice, and lavender bitters.

Add ice and shake vigorously for 20 seconds.

Strain into chilled Champagne flute and top with sparkling wine.

Garnish drink with lavender and serve.

Santé!

Eat Good Food

Pan Bagnat Sandwich Recipe

sandwich

Pan bagnat, or “bathed bread,” is the Provençal sandwich found at every bakery and market in the region. A sandwich in name but packed with tomatoes, local bell peppers, black Niçoise olives, anchovies and tuna, pan bagnat is basically a salade Niçoise on crusty bread. What’s not to like!

Here’s how to make your own.

Pan Bagnat

2 ripe tomatoes, cored and thinly sliced crosswise
1 (5-oz.) can olive oil-packed tuna, drained
1 small red onion, thinly sliced
1⁄2 cup arugula
1⁄3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
1 tbsp Dijon mustard
1 rustic baguette, split
1 small bulb fennel, cored and thinly sliced crosswise
2 hard-boiled eggs, thinly sliced crosswise
8 salt-cured anchovies, briefly soaked to remove salt, then dried
1-2 tbsp Nicoise olive powder
Freshly ground black pepper and Kosher salt, to taste

Sprinkle tomato slices liberally with salt and transfer to a colander; set aside to drain for 30 minutes.

In a small bowl, break up tuna with a fork. In another small bowl, whisk together oil and mustard; set dressing aside.

Scoop the insides from the bread loaf and reserve for another use. Place tomatoes evenly over the bottom of the bread and then top with arugula, fennel, and red onion; spread tuna over top, then top with egg slices, anchovies, and Nicoise olive powder.

Pour dressing evenly over ingredients, and season with salt and pepper; cover with top of bread, pressing lightly. Wrap tightly and allow time for flavors to mingle before slicing in quarters.

Recipe adapted from Saveur Magazine